Center of Excellence – Homeland Security Emergency Management

July 8, 2014

Understanding Our Future Workforce

Filed under: Education,General Interest — coe at 5:11 pm

By: Kellie Hale

The new generation of young adults entering the workforce has gotten a bad reputation as being lazy, spoiled, entitled, and self-involved. Why is that and is it fair to judge them harshly? If you say yes, because you are uncertain if they have the appropriate or necessary skills for today’s workplace, then you are not looking at the bigger picture of how valuable young workers representing the Gen Y age group, aka Millennials can bring to the workforce. To help ease your hesitancy and apprehension about hiring Millennials, I have researched how they can be beneficial to, not only your organization, but the whole workforce.

What Millennials Can Contribute to the Workforce

Millennials, the generation born from 1980-2001, are an important part of the workforce.  What Millennials can offer to employers are a lot of opportunities. They are technologically savvy, innovative, highly entrepreneurial, and achievement oriented. Understanding the personal views of a millennial employee can help an organization thrive. By 2020, the workforce in the United States will be roughly 50% Millennials and 75% globally by 2030. Due to the total size of this demographic, organizations will have to re-think how they deliver their policies and practices if they want to stay ahead and move forward successfully. The Millennials should be seen as, not only the future, but the present and are willing to work when given the chance to succeed.

Benefits to Hiring Millennials

Whether as interns or permanent employees, it is the smart employers who are embracing the potential of the millennial generation to make significant contributions that can help lead to the success of their organization. There are certain defining characteristics in today’s generation of interns/employees. Being able to understand the qualities they bring can be beneficial to your organization such as the following:

1. Tech-savvy: As I mentioned earlier, Gen Y is very knowledgeable about today’s technology since they are the first generation to be brought up with computers. They can uncover, operate, and recommend the most advanced tools and technologies. For example, a millennial intern/employee can help teach you and your organization how to understand and use social media along with content management systems.

2. Cost-effective: Despite what people claim about Millennials being self-involved or have a sense of entitlement, they are actually they generation to appear less motivated by money. They prefer to find a proper balance and flexibility between work and home life.

3. Team players: Millennials have a heighted sense of community and peer-to-peer relationships. This translates into them having more of a group mentality and an increased ability to collaborate in the workplace.

4. Acceptance seeking: Millennials will work hard to make sure it is of a positive nature.

5. Self-expressive: In the workplace, Millennials are not afraid to put their ideas out there. They can offer new solutions and fresh perspectives.

6. Conscious of the competition: This generation of interns/employees are more willing to count their blessings when it comes to employment opportunities. They know that there is always someone willing to take their place. This makes them more likely to put in the extra effort in order to stand out amongst the rest.

7. Current: The Millennial generation can help keep your organization up to date with trends in social media, entertainment, technologies, and other markets.

Summary

Building a relationship that can offer the millennial generation an opportunity to grow with your organization can be a rewarding experience for both parties involved. Do not allow yourself to be fooled by the bad press in regards to Millennials. Yes, they may be a tad different than you. Weren’t you when you started out in the workforce? With the right attitude and designating the appropriate management style, working with Millennials as either interns or permanent employees can make all difference in helping an organization soar and succeed.

 

 

Works Cited

Fambro, Cassie. Denying millennials a chance in the workforce isn’t beneficial to anyone (Millennial Moment, Cassie Fambro). 28 February 2014.

Hoffman, Cynthia. The Mystery Behind Millenials: What They Can Contribute, How They Can Prepare. 14 January 2013.

Meister, Jeanne. Three Reasons You Need To Adopt A Millennial Mindset Regardless Of Your Age. 5 October 2012.

Resources, Employer. “Gen Y” interns: 7 Reasons Why They Are Good Hires. 23 July 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 17, 2014

Center of Excellence: Advisory Committee Meeting Summary

Filed under: Event,General Interest — coe at 4:51 pm

On February 25, 2014 The Center of Excellence for Homeland Security Emergency Management (HSEM) and Pierce College’s HSEM Degree Program held its first Advisory Committee Meeting of the year at the Port of Tacoma. The Committee elected Steve Reinbrecht and Keith Weir as Co-Chairs along with honoring our past Committee Chair, Vickie Brown for her six year services. She was unable to attend, but will be staying on as a member. We have four new members added to our Advisory Committee. Gerald Fiola is the Manager of Port Security at the Port of Tacoma; Bryant Harrison (alternate for Pat Massey) works at FEMA Region 10 specializes training and education in EM; Chris Johnson is an EM Program Manager at Virginia Mason Hospital & Medical Center; Richard Schroedel (alternate for Lowell Porter) works for Pierce County Emergency Management in supervising the Mitigation/Planning/Recovery process; and Jamye Wisecup is the Westside Representative at the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office in their Emergency Management Unit. Wisecup replaced former member, Ute Weber as our WSEMA representative.

After the approval of the October 22, 2013 meeting minutes our new members provided updates from their respected organizations and programs. Bryant Harrison updated everyone about the impacts on Alaska and Japan earthquake regarding radiation. He also mentioned how FEMA is trying to identify knowledge, skills, and ability (KSA) for their staff. FEMA is also transitioning to incident support instead of incident response. Harrison shared that the organization is working on new job titles and job organizations. Jeff Parsons at State Emergency Management Division (EMD) shared about the changes that happened at EMD. Parsons is in the business sector and deals with private business continuity. He explained that risk management is need for businesses. EMD staff, George Crawford is back to covering earthquake drills and exercises. Robert Ezelle is the new Director for EMD and he took command a year ago. Parson also shared that the Cascadia kick off for 2015 is in the works.

Jamye Wisecup works for WSEMA and replaced former Advisory Committee member, Ute Weber. Wisecup was unable to attend the meeting physically, but called via conference call to inform everyone what WSEMA has been up to this past year. The 2014 WSEMA conference is set to be hosted in Spokane on September 23-25. Wisecup informed that the organization is already working on the 2015-2016 conferences. The 2015 WSEMA conference will be a joint conference with Oregon. She also made notions to present to the WSEMA board about the HSEM curriculum and textbook requirements.

New member, Chris Johnson is involved with the Allied Health of EM. He said it is important we integrate Allied Health into the EM field. COE Director, Linda Crerar says that there is a possibility of establishing a certificate in Emergency Health and that one of the pieces that is missing to Health and EM is the lack of connectivity between each other. Johnson commented, “We want people in the Allied Health field to learn how to respond to a disaster.”  He also mentioned that often health care professions only want to interact when there is a disaster and that there isn’t anything really established where they could start working together. Co-Chair, Steve Reinbrecht mentioned that he feels that the HSEM program is very EM heavy and not very robust on the security side. He says we should split 50/50 EM, Pandemic, and Continuity of Operations.

Vice President of Workforce Education for Pierce College, Jo Ann Baria discussed plans to help military veterans transition into new careers and education. Baria said, “Our goal is to help veterans transition their skills from the military to civilian life. They will need access for advising on how to transition out and have information available about a pathway for education and employment.” Research has shown that there are four areas that are pretty common to transition veterans: (1) medic to nursing (some grant money is funded to help research. Trying to align what the gaps are in order to transition them faster. Carol Knight-Wallace was hired to research the skills, gaps, and trends), (2) HSEM and Criminal Justice field (Will get some money to help identify the gap areas,

(3) Trade Transportation and Logistics Management (Maybe next year a work group will get hired), (4) IT. Apprenticeships will need to be developed in order to help the veterans’ transition faster and easier. The HSEM degree program is happy to announce that they will develop a Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) degree pathway by fall 2016. Advisory Committee member, Alisha Griswold (Port of Seattle) will help the degree program develop the Information Technology Certificate.

Ron May, Dean of Applied Technology/Allied Health Division shared that Pierce College’s marketing team has come up with a new initiative to market the school and programs’ Advisory Committees. What they would like to do is use Advisory Committees for marketing. They would take a picture and have members quote about the organization they are with. Robert Lord has volunteered the HSEM Advisory Committee members to participate. Linda directed everyone’s attention to the new COE-HSEM wire frame website content and address. We are going to be taking down our old site and replacing it with our new redesigned website. Amy Foster, a graphics and web designer at the college is helping the Center with the redesign for the new website. Robert Lord showed the members his educational plan for the Fire Command and HSEM degree programs and mentioned that he would like to integrate some of the HSEM courses with the FCA.

The next Advisory Committee meeting will take place on May 20, 2014 at Pierce County Emergency Management. Lowell Porter, Director of Pierce County Emergency Management, will be introduced as a new member and the Center and HSEM degree program are ecstatic about the new addition to the list of members. The upcoming meeting will focus more on a discussion of topics that our Co-Chairs will assist. Our goal is to keep the members engaged with what is going on in the industry and how we can improve our program.

 

 

March 6, 2014

Press Release: 2014 COE-HSEM Summit!

2014 State of the State – Discovering Communities of Practice and Career Pathways in HSEM Summit: June 17 & 18, McGavick Conference Center, Lakewood, WA.

The Homeland Security Emergency Management industry is rapidly growing and changing. Jobs within the industry are varied and becoming more specialized and technical. This Summit, sponsored by the Center of Excellence for Homeland Security Emergency Management, will bring together practitioners and educators from around the state to share their knowledge and experience with others in this “communities of practice.”

This Summit will address many issues including the importance of all hazards Emergency Management as it is being used in both the public and private business sector, the intersections of health care and cyber security with Emergency Management and the changing world on eLearning with new tools and other innovations.

Who is part of this “Communities of Practice” that should be attending our Summit?

 

-        First Responders

-        IT Professionals

-        Allied/Public Health Educators & Practitioners

-        Risk Management & Business Continuity Professionals

-        HSEM Educators and Practitioners

-        Global Trade Supply Chain Management Industries

-        Public Safety and Private Security

-        Maritime Port & Transportation Security

-        Food Safety and Food Security

Registration will available on our website, http://www.pierce.ctc.edu/dist/coe/ , starting March 25, 2014. Please contact Kellie Hale at khale@pierce.ctc.edu for more information

January 24, 2014

Puget Sound Cyber Security Summit

Filed under: Education,Emergency Preparedness,Event,Washington State — coe at 5:32 pm

2014 Puget Sound Cyber Security Summit

Cascadia Subduction Zone 2016 Castrophic Earthquake and Tsumani Exercise Kick-Off Meeting

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness,Event,Training,Washington State — coe at 5:31 pm

Cascadia

December 16, 2013

Prevent Cold Injury, Frostbite, and Hypothermia

Cold injuries can occur whenever air temperature is below freezing (32 degrees F). Freezing of the skin surface is called ‘frost nip‘. When freezing extends deeper though the skin and flesh, the injury is called ‘frostbite‘.

Hypothermia is a life threatening condition in which deep-body temperature falls below 95°F (normally 98.6°F).

While you can get hypothermia even during relatively warm conditions, when temperatures plummet the danger and risk of getting frost nip, frostbite, or hypothermia becomes even greater – because it can come on much faster.

Tips to prevent hypothermia…

Body temperature falls when the body cannot produce heat as fast as it is being lost.

 

Heat Loss Through The Head

At rest, the body core loses about 7 percent of its heat through the head.

When exercising, the head will lose more body heat which can ramp up to 50 percent heat loss, but the heat loss percentage will then diminish when you start to sweat and when your muscles start demanding more blood flow.

When in hypothermia however (shivering), core body heat loss through the head increases to as much as 55 percent and remains at this high level.

 

Cold Injury and Hypothermia Prevention Tips

Stay hydrated. A dehydrated body will slow blood circulation.

Avoid smoking – nicotine will constrict the blood vessels.

Avoid alcohol and caffeine which can lead to dehydration.

If cold, it is better to be active than to huddle up.

Heat production is increased by physical activity, but avoid sweating.

Don’t skip meals which will lead to slower metabolism and blood flow.

Wear the right clothes the right way.

Too much clothing can cause overheating and dehydration.

Avoid tight fitting clothing.

Clothes should be worn loose and in layers.

Clothing should be made of material that water vapor can pass through.

Avoid 100 percent cotton. Use synthetic fabrics for wicking moisture.

Use water and wind resistant outerwear. Nylon, Gore-Tex.

Socks should be changed frequently.

Keep hands well protected. Mittens are better than gloves.

Cover your head. Wear a hat!

Use insulated hats and gloves made with materials such as Thinsulate™

Stay Dry. Stay Dry. Stay Dry.

A very lean person is more susceptible to cold (fat is an insulator).

Self Check by pinching your fingernail to watch how fast the blood returns to your finger.

Avoid being alone in the very cold. Buddy system.

Keep an eye on your children who don’t know about the dangers of cold.

Keep a survival kit nearby which should include a means to make fire.

Know how to build a fire and how to procure tinder and kindling in wet conditions.

Understand ‘wind chill’ and avoid windy places.

 

Winter Storm Prepardness

When there are forecasts of a winter storm bearing down on you, remember this… BEFORE the winter storm hits, check the following winter weather preparedness items for your home and your vehicle…

This short list should be a general reminder of things for you to think about BEFORE a winter storm strikes. In no way is this list all-inclusive (it would take a book), and in fact this list is quite minimal. If you’re interested, there are many additional articles to be found within our blog regarding preparedness, preps, and being better prepared.
Food Supply
While most people have enough food in their home to last at least a few days, double-check your consumables in advance of others clearing out the grocery store shelves of milk and bread, etc.

You should ALWAYS have some food in your vehicle (as in, 72-hour emergency kit). At a minimum, keep a number of food bars (typically 200-calories each) in case you’re stranded or delayed in bad weather. In theory, 10 of these would be enough calories for a day’s survival for one person.

Medicinal Needs
If you know that you are nearing a prescription refill, it is better to take care of that before a winter storm.

Flashlights and Batteries
Check your flashlights that they work. Do you need more batteries? Do you have a flashlight in your vehicle?
LED Lantern technology 
Best Rechargeable Batteries

Portable AM/FM Radio
Having a battery operated portable AM/FM/Shortwave radio is imperative for when the power goes out. It will become your source to information from the outside world.
Best Cheap Portable Radio
Best Portable AM/FM/Shortwave Radio

Weather Radio
A public alert weather radio is good all year round for all severe weather. During the winter you will be alerted to winter storm watches and warnings, and more…
NOAA Weather Radio Basics

Portable Emergency Heater
Most home heating systems will not operate if the power goes out. It is prudent to consider an alternative means of keeping warm in your home.
Mr. Heater Buddy

Sleeping Bag
If the power goes out, it would do you well to have a decent sleeping bag, which will keep you warmer than just in bed with blankets. Lots to pick from… Check temperature ratings…
Queen Size Sleeping Bag

Coffee Percolator
Creature comforts are important too. If you are like most people and you drink coffee in the morning, about the only way you’re going to get that cup of coffee when the power goes out is with a percolator (along with a portable camp stove to heat it).
Coffee Percolator

Portable Cook Stove
Without power, a portable camp stove will allow you to heat food, etc. Check for safety issues regarding cooking indoors. Some are deemed safe, while others are not.
Portable Gas Stove

Blankets
Do you have warm blankets at home? It is also important to keep a blanket to wrap around you in your vehicle during the winter.
The Warmest Survival Blanket

Road Flares
Should you get ditched in a snow drift or an unfortunate accident, a series of road flares will greatly increase visibility and caution for other drivers. You can find these at auto-parts stores and other stores…

Snow Shovels
I know this is pretty obvious. But don’t forget to keep a snow shovel in your vehicle! They make all sizes and shapes, so find one that will fit in your trunk.

Ice Melter
There are several types of ‘road salt’ for melting ice. There are also specific varieties that are pet-safe (won’t hurt their paws). Keep some at home, and a small bag in your trunk of the vehicle. Kitty litter works well for temporary traction.

Ice Scraper
Just be sure that you remember to put it in your vehicle. I would get a new one each year because the plastic blade tends to chip after a bit of usage and will not always do as good a job on the window the following winter.

Windshield Washer Fluid
Get the kind that is good to below zero-degrees! Otherwise it will freeze and won’t spray on your windshield when you need it the most. Check the label.

Fill Your Tank
Always keep your gas tank closer to FULL than EMPTY, especially during the winter.
The point is to run through an overview of what you might need BEFORE a winter storm hits. The big thing is to plan for an assumption that you may lose power. This is where it gets most dangerous (other than the dangers of driving during a winter storm). Be safe.

 

15 Tips for Staying Safe While Out Shopping

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness,General Interest — coe at 8:38 pm

Burglars know that shoppers are out shopping during the holiday season, and look for easy targets and vulnerabilities to exploit.

Here are a few common-sense tips to reduce the odds of becoming a victim…

1. Eliminate any signs that you are gone. Make your house look like you are home. Leave some lights on. Leave the TV or radio on.

2. Don’t tweet or facebook your social status that you are out shopping.

3. Maintain situational awareness of what is happening around you.

4. Don’t daydream while you’re walking around.

5. Keep your head up and look around you. Look confident.

6. Avoid walking around with your head down in your smart phone while texting.

7. Shoppers should always keep one hand free. When you are carrying a lot of bags or packages in both hands, you are more vulnerable.

8. When you are out shopping, go with someone else. Shop in pairs. Thieves are less likely to strike when there are a lot of people around.

9. Ladies, avoid carrying a purse. Instead, just carry your ID and payment in your pocket. You might consolidate those things (including additional necessities) into a smaller wallet which could drop into your pocket while shopping. You could keep your purse in the trunk of the car if you must bring it with you.

10. Carry pepper spray. Particularly when going to and from a parking lot, carry it in your hand while walking towards your vehicle. It is convenient to attach to your key-ring.

11. Have your car keys out and ready BEFORE you get to your car.

12. If you are licensed to carry a firearm, do so. It is your ultimate protection. If you are not, then you might consider looking into it.

13. If you are carrying a lot of packages back to your car, look around you. See if anyone is watching you loading packages into your car.

14. Put purchases in the trunk, out of sight. Not in your back seat.

15. Shoppers who are out late should park in well-lit areas.

Source: Ken Jorgustin via http://modernsurvivalblog.com/security/tips-for-staying-safe-while-out-shopping/

August 26, 2013

Did You Know…? Hurricanes on the Horizon!

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness — coe at 10:30 am

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) recently updated its 2013 Hurricane Season Outlook. Because the season has already produced several named storms in the Atlantic hurricane region, NOAA now predicts an above-average hurricane season, with the possibility of being very active.

This season is expected to produce 13-19 named storms, of which 6-9 are expected to become hurricanes and 3-5 to become major hurricanes. The season ends November 30 but peak season runs mid-August to late October.

While the Eastern Pacific hurricane season is expected to be below normal, it only takes one hurricane or tropical storm to cause a disaster which can occur whether a season is active or mostly quiet.
Therefore, people are urged to prepare for every hurricane season regardless of the outlook. In addition to having an emergency kit and family communications plan, you should:

 Learn your community evacuation route;
 Have paper maps on hand in case cellular networks are down;
 Cover your home’s windows with storm shutters or plywood; and
 Get flood insurance protection.

Hurricanes can produce heavy rains that may cause extensive flooding. Homeowners insurance typically does not cover flood dam-age. To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself contact the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration.

Before a Hurricane

To prepare for a hurricane, you should take the following measures:
To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.

 Know your surroundings.
 Learn the elevation level of your property and whether the land is flood-prone. This will help you know how your property will be affected when storm surge or tidal flooding are forecasted.
 Identify levees and dams in your area and determine whether they pose a hazard to you.
 Learn community hurricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine where you would go and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate.
 Make plans to secure your property:
 Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.
 Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
 Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
 Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
 Reinforce your garage doors; if wind enters a garage it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage.
 Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
 Determine how and where to secure your boat.
 Install a generator for emergencies.
 If in a high-rise building, be prepared to take shelter on or below the 10th floor.
 Consider building a safe room.

Hurricanes cause heavy rains that can cause extensive flood damage in coastal and inland areas. Everyone is at risk and should consider flood insurance protection. Flood insurance is the only way to financially protect your property or business from flood damage. To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself and your business, visit the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (NFIP) Web site,www.floodsmart.gov or call 1-800-427-2419.

During a Hurricane

If a hurricane is likely in your area, you should:

 Listen to the radio or TV for information.
 Secure your home, close storm shutters and secure outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
Turn off utilities if instructed to do so. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
 Turn off propane tanks
 Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
 Moor your boat if time permits.

Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purpose such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other larger containers with water.
Find out how to keep food safe during and after and emergency.
You should evacuate under the following conditions:
If you are directed by local authorities to do so. Be sure to follow their instructions.

 If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure – such shelter are particularly hazardous during hurricane no matter how well fastened to the ground.
 If you live in a high-rise building – hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.
 If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an island waterway.

Read more about evacuating yourself and your family. If you are unable to evacuate, go to your wind-safe room. If you do not have one, follow these guidelines:

 Stay indoors during the hurricane and away from windows and glass doors.
 Close all interior doors – secure and brace external doors.
 Keep curtains and blinds closed. Do not be fooled if there is a lull; it could be the eye of the storm – winds will pick up again.
 Take refuge in a small interior room, closet or hallway on the lowest level.
 Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.

Avoid elevators!

After a Hurricane

 Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates.
 Stay alert for extended rainfall and subsequent flooding even after the hurricane or tropical storm has ended.

If you have become separated from your family, use your family communications plan or contact the American Red Cross at 1-800-RED-CROSS/1-800-733-2767 or visit the American Red Cross Safe and Well site: www.safeandwell.org

The American Red Cross also maintains a database to help you find family. Contact the local American Red Cross chapter where you are staying for information. Do not contact the chapter in the disaster area.

 If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe.
 If you cannot return home and have immediate housing needs. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the near-est shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).

For those who have longer-term housing needs, FEMA offers several types of assistance, including services and grants to help people repair their homes and find replacement housing. Apply for assistance or search for information about housing rental resources

 Drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed¬ out bridges. Stay off the streets. If you must go out watch for fallen objects; downed electrical wires; and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks.
 Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the power company.
 Walk carefully around the outside your home and check for loose power lines, gas leaks and structural damage before entering.
 Stay out of any building if you smell gas, floodwaters remain around the building or your home was damaged by fire and the authorities have not declared it safe.
 Inspect your home for damage. Take pictures of damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance purposes. If you have any doubts about safety, have your residence inspected by a qualified building inspector or structural engineer before entering.
 Use battery-powered flashlights in the dark. Do NOT use candles. Note: The flashlight should be turned on outside before enter-ing – the battery may produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.
 Watch your pets closely and keep them under your direct control. Watch out for wild animals, especially poisonous snakes. Use a stick to poke through debris.
 Avoid drinking or preparing food with tap water until you are sure it’s not contaminated.
 Check refrigerated food for spoilage. If in doubt, throw it out.
 Wear protective clothing and be cautious when cleaning up to avoid injury.
 Use the telephone only for emergency calls.

 

Source: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA)

July 30, 2013

Emergency Management Degrees

Filed under: Education — coe at 7:39 pm

With Emergency Management becoming a growing industry, many universities and schools across the U.S. are now offering degree/certificate programs about HSEM. The educational training a student can receive can help them build towards a career as an emergency program manager or director, emergency preparedness instructor/coordinator, risk management expert, or technical training supervisor.

Universities/Schools that offer Emergency Management Degrees:

 

California University of Pennsylvania – California University of Pennsylvania, Middle States Accredited, 158 years young, part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, is proud to offer undergraduate and graduate programs in Legal Studies. The MS in Legal Studies includes tracks in Law and Public Policy, Homeland Security and Criminal Justice. Programs are ONLINE and delivered in a flexible and quality environment for busy adults seeking professional advancement. Veterans approved! Cal U also offers an ONLINE Certificate in Homeland Security through the Institute of Law and Public Policy.  Visit our website at www.calu.edu for additional information.

Degree Programs:

  • BS      in Legal Studies
  • MS      in Legal Studies:  Homeland Security
  • MS      in Legal Studies:  Law and Public      Policy
  • MS      in Legal Studies:  Criminal Justice

 

American Military University (AMU) – American Military University serves civilian and military students 100% online with emergency and disaster management degrees and NIMS-related courses. Whether responding to hurricanes, terrorist attacks, or hazmat spills, officials need to know how to establish command & control, coordinate communications, evacuate people, and perform clean-up. AMU offers both degree programs and professional development options in emergency management.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • B.A. Emergency & Disaster Management
  • B.S. in Fire Science Management
  • M.A. Emergency & Disaster Management
  • M.A. in Public Administration
  • M.A in Homeland Security

 

George Washington University – The goal of The Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management is to improve the disaster, emergency, and crisis management plans, actions and decisions of government, corporate, and not-for-profit organizations by transforming theory into practice. The Institute’s objectives are to create and teach courses in crisis, disaster, and risk management; conduct research, and create knowledge through its research activities; and disseminate knowledge through education al programs, professional forums, and workshops. The Institute faculty and staff work to facilitate exchanges of crisis management information, knowledge, and best practices among all sectors. The Institute is engaged in both domestic and international endeavors.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • M.S. with a concentration in Crisis, Emergency, and Risk Management
  • Ph.D. with a concentration in Crisis, Emergency, and Risk Management
  • Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response
  • Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management and Public Health

 

Lewis University Online – Take your next step toward advancement in emergency management, disaster response and public safety with the Lewis University MS in Public Safety Administration. The curriculum and coursework offer you tools and skill sets that you can use right away.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • Master of Science in Public Safety Administration

 

North Dakota State University – The graduate concentration in Emergency Management and Homeland Security (EMHS) provides advanced education in the management of emergencies, hazards, disasters, and homeland security. The EMHS program is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to work or currently work in the field of emergency management and homeland security.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • Master of Public Administration with graduate concentration in Emergency Management and Homeland Security
  • Emergency Management and Homeland Security Certificate
  • Homeland Defense Certificate

 

University of Chicago – The Master of Science in Threat and Response Management is designed to prepare public health professionals, law enforcement officials, fire and emergency personnel, medical and nursing professionals, and policy makers to respond to and recover from complex incidents regardless of their size or cause. These incidents can range from terrorist attacks; biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear threats; natural disasters; and disease outbreaks. Upon completion of the core requirements, students choose one of two concentrations—Scientific/Threat or Administrative/Response Preparedness—to further focus their studies.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • M.S. Threat and Response Management

 

University of Maryland University College (UMUC) – Homeland security concerns have created an urgent need for emergency management professionals in both government and private sectors. University of Maryland University College (UMUC) can prepare you for leadership in this rewarding career field. UMUC offers convenient online and on-site classes where coursework will prepare you for professional certification in emergency management. Scholarships, loans and an interest-free monthly payment plan available.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • B.S. Emergency Management
  • B.S. Fire Science
  • B.S. Homeland Security
  • MBA/M.S. in Technology Management with Homeland Security Specialization

 

University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) – Earn an Executive Master of Science Degree in Crisis and Emergency Management. Whether you’re a current or future crisis and emergency manager, earning an Executive Master of Science Degree in Crisis and Emergency Management (ECEM) from UNLV will better position you for more responsible assignments in your career.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • M.S. Crisis and Emergency Managament

 

Source: http://www.emergencymgmt.com/training/Emergency-Management-Degrees.html

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