Center of Excellence – Homeland Security Emergency Management

January 24, 2014

Cascadia Subduction Zone 2016 Castrophic Earthquake and Tsumani Exercise Kick-Off Meeting

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness,Event,Training,Washington State — coe at 5:31 pm

Cascadia

December 16, 2013

Prevent Cold Injury, Frostbite, and Hypothermia

Cold injuries can occur whenever air temperature is below freezing (32 degrees F). Freezing of the skin surface is called ‘frost nip‘. When freezing extends deeper though the skin and flesh, the injury is called ‘frostbite‘.

Hypothermia is a life threatening condition in which deep-body temperature falls below 95°F (normally 98.6°F).

While you can get hypothermia even during relatively warm conditions, when temperatures plummet the danger and risk of getting frost nip, frostbite, or hypothermia becomes even greater – because it can come on much faster.

Tips to prevent hypothermia…

Body temperature falls when the body cannot produce heat as fast as it is being lost.

 

Heat Loss Through The Head

At rest, the body core loses about 7 percent of its heat through the head.

When exercising, the head will lose more body heat which can ramp up to 50 percent heat loss, but the heat loss percentage will then diminish when you start to sweat and when your muscles start demanding more blood flow.

When in hypothermia however (shivering), core body heat loss through the head increases to as much as 55 percent and remains at this high level.

 

Cold Injury and Hypothermia Prevention Tips

Stay hydrated. A dehydrated body will slow blood circulation.

Avoid smoking – nicotine will constrict the blood vessels.

Avoid alcohol and caffeine which can lead to dehydration.

If cold, it is better to be active than to huddle up.

Heat production is increased by physical activity, but avoid sweating.

Don’t skip meals which will lead to slower metabolism and blood flow.

Wear the right clothes the right way.

Too much clothing can cause overheating and dehydration.

Avoid tight fitting clothing.

Clothes should be worn loose and in layers.

Clothing should be made of material that water vapor can pass through.

Avoid 100 percent cotton. Use synthetic fabrics for wicking moisture.

Use water and wind resistant outerwear. Nylon, Gore-Tex.

Socks should be changed frequently.

Keep hands well protected. Mittens are better than gloves.

Cover your head. Wear a hat!

Use insulated hats and gloves made with materials such as Thinsulate™

Stay Dry. Stay Dry. Stay Dry.

A very lean person is more susceptible to cold (fat is an insulator).

Self Check by pinching your fingernail to watch how fast the blood returns to your finger.

Avoid being alone in the very cold. Buddy system.

Keep an eye on your children who don’t know about the dangers of cold.

Keep a survival kit nearby which should include a means to make fire.

Know how to build a fire and how to procure tinder and kindling in wet conditions.

Understand ‘wind chill’ and avoid windy places.

 

Winter Storm Prepardness

When there are forecasts of a winter storm bearing down on you, remember this… BEFORE the winter storm hits, check the following winter weather preparedness items for your home and your vehicle…

This short list should be a general reminder of things for you to think about BEFORE a winter storm strikes. In no way is this list all-inclusive (it would take a book), and in fact this list is quite minimal. If you’re interested, there are many additional articles to be found within our blog regarding preparedness, preps, and being better prepared.
Food Supply
While most people have enough food in their home to last at least a few days, double-check your consumables in advance of others clearing out the grocery store shelves of milk and bread, etc.

You should ALWAYS have some food in your vehicle (as in, 72-hour emergency kit). At a minimum, keep a number of food bars (typically 200-calories each) in case you’re stranded or delayed in bad weather. In theory, 10 of these would be enough calories for a day’s survival for one person.

Medicinal Needs
If you know that you are nearing a prescription refill, it is better to take care of that before a winter storm.

Flashlights and Batteries
Check your flashlights that they work. Do you need more batteries? Do you have a flashlight in your vehicle?
LED Lantern technology 
Best Rechargeable Batteries

Portable AM/FM Radio
Having a battery operated portable AM/FM/Shortwave radio is imperative for when the power goes out. It will become your source to information from the outside world.
Best Cheap Portable Radio
Best Portable AM/FM/Shortwave Radio

Weather Radio
A public alert weather radio is good all year round for all severe weather. During the winter you will be alerted to winter storm watches and warnings, and more…
NOAA Weather Radio Basics

Portable Emergency Heater
Most home heating systems will not operate if the power goes out. It is prudent to consider an alternative means of keeping warm in your home.
Mr. Heater Buddy

Sleeping Bag
If the power goes out, it would do you well to have a decent sleeping bag, which will keep you warmer than just in bed with blankets. Lots to pick from… Check temperature ratings…
Queen Size Sleeping Bag

Coffee Percolator
Creature comforts are important too. If you are like most people and you drink coffee in the morning, about the only way you’re going to get that cup of coffee when the power goes out is with a percolator (along with a portable camp stove to heat it).
Coffee Percolator

Portable Cook Stove
Without power, a portable camp stove will allow you to heat food, etc. Check for safety issues regarding cooking indoors. Some are deemed safe, while others are not.
Portable Gas Stove

Blankets
Do you have warm blankets at home? It is also important to keep a blanket to wrap around you in your vehicle during the winter.
The Warmest Survival Blanket

Road Flares
Should you get ditched in a snow drift or an unfortunate accident, a series of road flares will greatly increase visibility and caution for other drivers. You can find these at auto-parts stores and other stores…

Snow Shovels
I know this is pretty obvious. But don’t forget to keep a snow shovel in your vehicle! They make all sizes and shapes, so find one that will fit in your trunk.

Ice Melter
There are several types of ‘road salt’ for melting ice. There are also specific varieties that are pet-safe (won’t hurt their paws). Keep some at home, and a small bag in your trunk of the vehicle. Kitty litter works well for temporary traction.

Ice Scraper
Just be sure that you remember to put it in your vehicle. I would get a new one each year because the plastic blade tends to chip after a bit of usage and will not always do as good a job on the window the following winter.

Windshield Washer Fluid
Get the kind that is good to below zero-degrees! Otherwise it will freeze and won’t spray on your windshield when you need it the most. Check the label.

Fill Your Tank
Always keep your gas tank closer to FULL than EMPTY, especially during the winter.
The point is to run through an overview of what you might need BEFORE a winter storm hits. The big thing is to plan for an assumption that you may lose power. This is where it gets most dangerous (other than the dangers of driving during a winter storm). Be safe.

 

15 Tips for Staying Safe While Out Shopping

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness,General Interest — coe at 8:38 pm

Burglars know that shoppers are out shopping during the holiday season, and look for easy targets and vulnerabilities to exploit.

Here are a few common-sense tips to reduce the odds of becoming a victim…

1. Eliminate any signs that you are gone. Make your house look like you are home. Leave some lights on. Leave the TV or radio on.

2. Don’t tweet or facebook your social status that you are out shopping.

3. Maintain situational awareness of what is happening around you.

4. Don’t daydream while you’re walking around.

5. Keep your head up and look around you. Look confident.

6. Avoid walking around with your head down in your smart phone while texting.

7. Shoppers should always keep one hand free. When you are carrying a lot of bags or packages in both hands, you are more vulnerable.

8. When you are out shopping, go with someone else. Shop in pairs. Thieves are less likely to strike when there are a lot of people around.

9. Ladies, avoid carrying a purse. Instead, just carry your ID and payment in your pocket. You might consolidate those things (including additional necessities) into a smaller wallet which could drop into your pocket while shopping. You could keep your purse in the trunk of the car if you must bring it with you.

10. Carry pepper spray. Particularly when going to and from a parking lot, carry it in your hand while walking towards your vehicle. It is convenient to attach to your key-ring.

11. Have your car keys out and ready BEFORE you get to your car.

12. If you are licensed to carry a firearm, do so. It is your ultimate protection. If you are not, then you might consider looking into it.

13. If you are carrying a lot of packages back to your car, look around you. See if anyone is watching you loading packages into your car.

14. Put purchases in the trunk, out of sight. Not in your back seat.

15. Shoppers who are out late should park in well-lit areas.

Source: Ken Jorgustin via http://modernsurvivalblog.com/security/tips-for-staying-safe-while-out-shopping/

August 26, 2013

Did You Know…? Hurricanes on the Horizon!

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness — coe at 10:30 am

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) recently updated its 2013 Hurricane Season Outlook. Because the season has already produced several named storms in the Atlantic hurricane region, NOAA now predicts an above-average hurricane season, with the possibility of being very active.

This season is expected to produce 13-19 named storms, of which 6-9 are expected to become hurricanes and 3-5 to become major hurricanes. The season ends November 30 but peak season runs mid-August to late October.

While the Eastern Pacific hurricane season is expected to be below normal, it only takes one hurricane or tropical storm to cause a disaster which can occur whether a season is active or mostly quiet.
Therefore, people are urged to prepare for every hurricane season regardless of the outlook. In addition to having an emergency kit and family communications plan, you should:

 Learn your community evacuation route;
 Have paper maps on hand in case cellular networks are down;
 Cover your home’s windows with storm shutters or plywood; and
 Get flood insurance protection.

Hurricanes can produce heavy rains that may cause extensive flooding. Homeowners insurance typically does not cover flood dam-age. To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself contact the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration.

Before a Hurricane

To prepare for a hurricane, you should take the following measures:
To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.

 Know your surroundings.
 Learn the elevation level of your property and whether the land is flood-prone. This will help you know how your property will be affected when storm surge or tidal flooding are forecasted.
 Identify levees and dams in your area and determine whether they pose a hazard to you.
 Learn community hurricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine where you would go and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate.
 Make plans to secure your property:
 Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.
 Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
 Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
 Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
 Reinforce your garage doors; if wind enters a garage it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage.
 Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
 Determine how and where to secure your boat.
 Install a generator for emergencies.
 If in a high-rise building, be prepared to take shelter on or below the 10th floor.
 Consider building a safe room.

Hurricanes cause heavy rains that can cause extensive flood damage in coastal and inland areas. Everyone is at risk and should consider flood insurance protection. Flood insurance is the only way to financially protect your property or business from flood damage. To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself and your business, visit the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (NFIP) Web site,www.floodsmart.gov or call 1-800-427-2419.

During a Hurricane

If a hurricane is likely in your area, you should:

 Listen to the radio or TV for information.
 Secure your home, close storm shutters and secure outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
Turn off utilities if instructed to do so. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
 Turn off propane tanks
 Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
 Moor your boat if time permits.

Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purpose such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other larger containers with water.
Find out how to keep food safe during and after and emergency.
You should evacuate under the following conditions:
If you are directed by local authorities to do so. Be sure to follow their instructions.

 If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure – such shelter are particularly hazardous during hurricane no matter how well fastened to the ground.
 If you live in a high-rise building – hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.
 If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an island waterway.

Read more about evacuating yourself and your family. If you are unable to evacuate, go to your wind-safe room. If you do not have one, follow these guidelines:

 Stay indoors during the hurricane and away from windows and glass doors.
 Close all interior doors – secure and brace external doors.
 Keep curtains and blinds closed. Do not be fooled if there is a lull; it could be the eye of the storm – winds will pick up again.
 Take refuge in a small interior room, closet or hallway on the lowest level.
 Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.

Avoid elevators!

After a Hurricane

 Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates.
 Stay alert for extended rainfall and subsequent flooding even after the hurricane or tropical storm has ended.

If you have become separated from your family, use your family communications plan or contact the American Red Cross at 1-800-RED-CROSS/1-800-733-2767 or visit the American Red Cross Safe and Well site: www.safeandwell.org

The American Red Cross also maintains a database to help you find family. Contact the local American Red Cross chapter where you are staying for information. Do not contact the chapter in the disaster area.

 If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe.
 If you cannot return home and have immediate housing needs. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the near-est shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).

For those who have longer-term housing needs, FEMA offers several types of assistance, including services and grants to help people repair their homes and find replacement housing. Apply for assistance or search for information about housing rental resources

 Drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed¬ out bridges. Stay off the streets. If you must go out watch for fallen objects; downed electrical wires; and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks.
 Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the power company.
 Walk carefully around the outside your home and check for loose power lines, gas leaks and structural damage before entering.
 Stay out of any building if you smell gas, floodwaters remain around the building or your home was damaged by fire and the authorities have not declared it safe.
 Inspect your home for damage. Take pictures of damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance purposes. If you have any doubts about safety, have your residence inspected by a qualified building inspector or structural engineer before entering.
 Use battery-powered flashlights in the dark. Do NOT use candles. Note: The flashlight should be turned on outside before enter-ing – the battery may produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.
 Watch your pets closely and keep them under your direct control. Watch out for wild animals, especially poisonous snakes. Use a stick to poke through debris.
 Avoid drinking or preparing food with tap water until you are sure it’s not contaminated.
 Check refrigerated food for spoilage. If in doubt, throw it out.
 Wear protective clothing and be cautious when cleaning up to avoid injury.
 Use the telephone only for emergency calls.

 

Source: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA)

July 30, 2013

Emergency Management Degrees

Filed under: Education — coe at 7:39 pm

With Emergency Management becoming a growing industry, many universities and schools across the U.S. are now offering degree/certificate programs about HSEM. The educational training a student can receive can help them build towards a career as an emergency program manager or director, emergency preparedness instructor/coordinator, risk management expert, or technical training supervisor.

Universities/Schools that offer Emergency Management Degrees:

 

California University of Pennsylvania – California University of Pennsylvania, Middle States Accredited, 158 years young, part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, is proud to offer undergraduate and graduate programs in Legal Studies. The MS in Legal Studies includes tracks in Law and Public Policy, Homeland Security and Criminal Justice. Programs are ONLINE and delivered in a flexible and quality environment for busy adults seeking professional advancement. Veterans approved! Cal U also offers an ONLINE Certificate in Homeland Security through the Institute of Law and Public Policy.  Visit our website at www.calu.edu for additional information.

Degree Programs:

  • BS      in Legal Studies
  • MS      in Legal Studies:  Homeland Security
  • MS      in Legal Studies:  Law and Public      Policy
  • MS      in Legal Studies:  Criminal Justice

 

American Military University (AMU) – American Military University serves civilian and military students 100% online with emergency and disaster management degrees and NIMS-related courses. Whether responding to hurricanes, terrorist attacks, or hazmat spills, officials need to know how to establish command & control, coordinate communications, evacuate people, and perform clean-up. AMU offers both degree programs and professional development options in emergency management.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • B.A. Emergency & Disaster Management
  • B.S. in Fire Science Management
  • M.A. Emergency & Disaster Management
  • M.A. in Public Administration
  • M.A in Homeland Security

 

George Washington University – The goal of The Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management is to improve the disaster, emergency, and crisis management plans, actions and decisions of government, corporate, and not-for-profit organizations by transforming theory into practice. The Institute’s objectives are to create and teach courses in crisis, disaster, and risk management; conduct research, and create knowledge through its research activities; and disseminate knowledge through education al programs, professional forums, and workshops. The Institute faculty and staff work to facilitate exchanges of crisis management information, knowledge, and best practices among all sectors. The Institute is engaged in both domestic and international endeavors.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • M.S. with a concentration in Crisis, Emergency, and Risk Management
  • Ph.D. with a concentration in Crisis, Emergency, and Risk Management
  • Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response
  • Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management and Public Health

 

Lewis University Online – Take your next step toward advancement in emergency management, disaster response and public safety with the Lewis University MS in Public Safety Administration. The curriculum and coursework offer you tools and skill sets that you can use right away.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • Master of Science in Public Safety Administration

 

North Dakota State University – The graduate concentration in Emergency Management and Homeland Security (EMHS) provides advanced education in the management of emergencies, hazards, disasters, and homeland security. The EMHS program is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to work or currently work in the field of emergency management and homeland security.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • Master of Public Administration with graduate concentration in Emergency Management and Homeland Security
  • Emergency Management and Homeland Security Certificate
  • Homeland Defense Certificate

 

University of Chicago – The Master of Science in Threat and Response Management is designed to prepare public health professionals, law enforcement officials, fire and emergency personnel, medical and nursing professionals, and policy makers to respond to and recover from complex incidents regardless of their size or cause. These incidents can range from terrorist attacks; biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear threats; natural disasters; and disease outbreaks. Upon completion of the core requirements, students choose one of two concentrations—Scientific/Threat or Administrative/Response Preparedness—to further focus their studies.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • M.S. Threat and Response Management

 

University of Maryland University College (UMUC) – Homeland security concerns have created an urgent need for emergency management professionals in both government and private sectors. University of Maryland University College (UMUC) can prepare you for leadership in this rewarding career field. UMUC offers convenient online and on-site classes where coursework will prepare you for professional certification in emergency management. Scholarships, loans and an interest-free monthly payment plan available.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • B.S. Emergency Management
  • B.S. Fire Science
  • B.S. Homeland Security
  • MBA/M.S. in Technology Management with Homeland Security Specialization

 

University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) – Earn an Executive Master of Science Degree in Crisis and Emergency Management. Whether you’re a current or future crisis and emergency manager, earning an Executive Master of Science Degree in Crisis and Emergency Management (ECEM) from UNLV will better position you for more responsible assignments in your career.

Emergency Management Degree Programs:

  • M.S. Crisis and Emergency Managament

 

Source: http://www.emergencymgmt.com/training/Emergency-Management-Degrees.html

July 15, 2013

10 Ways To Be Prepared:

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness,General Interest — coe at 9:05 pm

1. Identify Your Risk
What are the hazards where you live and work? Find out what natural or human caused disasters pose a risk for you. Do you live or work in a flood plain, near a major earthquake fault or in a high fire danger area? Are you prepared for an unexpected human-made disaster that can strike at any time? Does your neighborhood or community have a disaster plan?

2. Create A Family Disaster Plan
Know where to meet if you have to evacuate. Designate a meeting place outside your home where family members can go. Know who you’ve identified as the out-of-state friend to be your “family contact” for everyone to check-in with. Keep a touch-tone phone (and phone cord) that does not require plugging into an electric outlet (after a disaster, cell phones and wireless phones may not be working). Take care of your family pets too. Store food and water for them in your disaster supply kit.

3. Practice Your Disaster Plan
Start by having family members meet at a designated spot outside your home – like you would after a fire or after the shaking stops. Know how to respond in the event of any disaster — whether to stay put indoors, or whether to evacuate your neighborhood by car. If your family needs to evacuate, know the proper evacuation procedures and routes.

4. Build A Disaster Survival Kit For Home And Car
If you are stranded in your car or have to be self sufficient at home until help arrives, you need to have a disaster kit with you.

Your home disaster supply kit should have at least the following items and be kept in containers that can be easily carried or moved such as backpacks, plastic totes or wheeled trash cans.

Carry a smaller kit in your car:
• Have at least a 3-day supply of non-perishable and canned food, and water for all family members. Replace water every six months. Don’t forget to restock food items.
• First Aid Kit.
• Battery-powered flashlight and portable radio with extra batteries. Replace batteries on a regular basis.
• Change of clothing and footwear, and one blanket or sleeping bag for each family member.
• Extra set of car keys, and a credit card and cash.
• Extra medications.
• Sanitation supplies (such as soap, cleaning supplies, shampoo, toilet tissue, etc.)
• An extra set of prescription glasses.
• Keep important family documents in a waterproof container.

5. Prepare Your Children
Talk to your kids about what the risks are and what your family will do if disaster strikes. Practice your family disaster plan every six months. Empower your children to help write the family plan, build the disaster supply, and lead the drills. The more informed and involved children are in disaster planning, the more prepared they will be.

6. Don’t Forget Those With Special Needs
Infants, seniors and those with special needs must not be forgotten. Make sure that supplies for your infant are in your kit and that you have items such as medications, or other medical supplies that seniors or persons with disabilities may need.

7. Learn CPR And First Aid
Contact your local chapter of the American Red Cross today and get trained on basic first aid and CPR.

8. Eliminate Hazards In Your Home And Workplace
You must secure the contents of your home or office to reduce hazards, especially during shaking from an earth-quake. Strap down large objects, secure cabinet doors, anchor tall furniture, and secure overhead objects such as ceiling fans and pictures. If you live in a high fire danger area, also take the necessary steps to protect your home against wildfires. Find out how you can make your home fire safe.

9. Stay Aware, And Understand The Risks
Stay abreast of the dangers and risks as they pertain to current events and the goings on in your local (and wider) area. Don’t be caught off-guard.

10. Get Involved, Volunteer, Bear Responsibility
Donate blood, join a local Community Emergency Response Team. Educate your neighbor(s). Volunteer. Perhaps join your local American Red Cross. Get involved and bear responsibility.

Source: Modern Survival Blog

4 Burglar Deterrents For Your Home Security

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness,General Interest — coe at 9:03 pm

These four simple, inexpensive, and practical security items WILL present a deterrent to a home burglar…
These cheap but effective home security devices provide effective deterrence and resistance to home burglary while you sleep peacefully at night.

1. Fake TV

This little device is amazingly effective in its similarity to a real TV from the perspective of a burglar who is outside looking at your windows during the night. It recreates the light of real TV with its bright LEDs which fill a room with light in thousands of possible shades of color while it simulates scene changes, fades,

swells, and on-screen motion. Just put it on a 24-hour timer for the evening hours, and from outside, it looks just like someone is home watching TV. Most burglars will not break into an occupied house.

2. Fake Security Camera

Today’s remarkably inexpensive fake security cameras look like the real thing and will completely fool a would-be burglar. Most of them also have a blinking LED light for realism. They can be mounted literally anywhere – with the idea being to have them in plain sight.

3. Door Security Bar

A security bar for your front and/or back door will provide an unbelievable amount of stopping power to a burglar attempting to force their way in. The harder they push, the more resistance it creates. It literally takes just seconds to place this under your doorknob at night before you go to bed.

4. Door Stop Alarm

While the security bar under your door handle will deter a burglar, a door-stop alarm will screech a siren should the door budge at all. This will alert you in the middle of the night, and give you time to dial 911 and take defense actions… This is also a great solution for those who travel overnight.

Source: Modern Survival Blog
http://modernsurvivalblog.com/security/4-burglar-deterrents-for-your-home-security/#more-28823

July 2, 2013

Emergency Management recommends ‘cooling’ centers to avoid excessive heat

Filed under: General Interest — coe at 5:36 pm

The National Weather Service has declared an excessive heat warning for the Puget Sound region until 11 p.m. Monday, July 1. The Pierce County Department of Emergency Management reminds everyone to stay out of the heat as much as possible, and to check on elderly neighbors during this time.

Locations around Pierce County that people can go to cool down include movie theaters, local malls, and other large stores, as well as Pierce County libraries throughout the region. Other facilities that are open include:

• Sprinker Recreation Center, 14824 C St. in Spanaway 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. • Anderson Island Fire Department, 12207 Lake Josephine Blvd. 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. • Fife Community Center, 2111 54th Ave. E 8:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Mon-Tue • City of Buckley Multi Purpose Center, 811 East Main 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Mon-Tues • Mid County Community Center, 10205 44th Ave. E in Tacoma 8:30 a.m. – 8 p.m. Mon-Thurs • Steilacoom Community Center, 2301 Worthington St 9 a.m.- 8 p.m. Mon-Thurs • Bonney Lake Senior Center, 19304 Bonney Lake Blvd 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Mon-Fri • Lakewood City Hall, 6000 Main St. SW 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Mon-Fri • Chapel Hill Church, 7700 Skansie Ave. in Gig Harbor 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Mon-Thurs

The following locations allow people and their domesticated pets to come in and get out of the heat. Pets

need to be on a leash or in a crate and owners much provide water if they plan on being in the store for long periods of time. • Lowe’s – all stores, from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. • Petsmart – all stores • VCA Pacific Avenue, 10324 Pacific Ave in Spanaway, open 24/7

According to the National Weather Service, an excessive heat warning means that a prolonged period of dangerously hot temperatures will occur. The combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a dangerous situation in which heat illnesses are likely.

Source: http://www.co.pierce.wa.us/

WSEMA Scholarship

Filed under: Education,General Interest — coe at 5:34 pm

WSEMA is pleased to announce that it is now receiving applications for the $2500 Joel Aggergaard Memorial Scholarship. WSEMA announces the winner of this scholarship at our annual Conference in September.

Eligible Applicants include students pursuing a certificate, diploma, baccalaureate, or graduate degree in emergency management or a closely related field. The scholarship award will be directly paid to the college.

All applicants must be residents of Washington State and attending a college or university in the State of Washington having completed one academic term (quarter or semester) prior to the scholarship application period. Applicants living in Washington State, participating in a distance learning program, are also eligible to apply.
Joel Aggergaard began working for the Washington State Department of Emergency Management in 1970′s and served until his untimely death in 1996. He thoroughly enjoyed his career with Emergency Management, and his “heart” was with supporting local Emergency Management Programs.

It may be necessary to be a local emergency manager to fully appreciate the enormous contribution Joel made to local programs during the years he worked with emergency management. If you have been stressed to the point there is not one additional free minute in your day, but you need to get an issue clarified with State Department of Emergency Management and it must be taken care of today …then… you will begin to understand. A phone call placed to Joel reached someone who was not only usually familiar with the issue but also very interested. The issues either became resolved or a commitment was made from Joel to follow-up for resolution.

Joel was commended for his extraordinary work with emergency management and named the “most helpful” state official by local, county and city emergency managers across Washington State. Joel assisted with countless floods, storms and local emergencies, and was a welcome addition to any activated Emergency Operating Center during a disaster.

Joel was also an avid supporter of youth and their activities. Because of his selfless support and commitment to local emergency management directors, WSEMA has chosen to provide an educational scholarship commemorating Joel in the hope that others who possess his worthy qualities and have a personal dedication to achievement may have expanded opportunities.

Joel’s life and dedication to emergency management in the State of Washington inspired this scholarship. Please pass along this opportunity to any students who qualify.

Deadline for application is August 1, 2013. Go to the WSEMA site to download the scholarship application: http://www.wsema.com/

Source: WSEMA

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