Resources from the National Disaster Distress Helpline

Below are resources from the national Disaster Distress Helpline + additional behavioral health resources to support immediate and long-term recovery following the shootings at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, FL on 6/12/16.

planning1When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us are able to bounce back. However, “Some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties,” said U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) SAMHSA Acting Administrator Kana Enomoto.

The Disaster Distress Helpline (DDH) is the first national hotline dedicated to providing year-round disaster crisis counseling. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746) to residents in the U.S. and its territories who are experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

SAMHSA
• SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Responder App http://store.samhsa.gov/apps/disaster/

• SAMHSA Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event: A Guide for Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers http://1.usa.gov/1D8mkrW

• SAMHSA Disaster Technical Assistance Center’s Disaster Behavioral Health Information Series: Resources for behavioral health providers, others supporting those impacted by terrorism: http://1.usa.gov/1XQ6cLb

Additional Resources

• The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) compilation of resources for parents, caregivers & educators re. terrorism http://bit.ly/1OjMXpG

• American Psychological Association (APA) Managing your distress in the aftermath of a shooting http://bit.ly/1dO88P8

• Common Sense Media Explaining the News to Our Kids http://bit.ly/1rkqho2