Course Offerings: Spring Quarter 2012

February 10th, 2012

 Spring Quarter begins April 2nd and runs through June 15th with an inservice day on May 11th and a holiday on May 28th.  Registration for Spring Quarter begins February 27th.  Students not enrolled Winter 2012 must apply for admission.  Advising for Spring Quarter begins February 21st.  For advising or further information, post a comment to this posting, contact Professor Terry Mirande at 253. 964.6476 or tmirande@pierce.ctc.edu.

INTP 202  Interpreting Skills for Health Care  4 credits
Meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 9:00 to 11:45
tuition and fees for Washington residents:  $419.56
In this course, students develop interpreting skills in sight translation and consecutive interpretation while developing glossaries and familiarity with a range of health care situations and expectations.  Pre-requisite:  INTP 110 and BTECH 150 (Medical Terminology I) or instructor permission. 

INTP courses all meet at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom.  INTP 202 fulfills a requirement for the Certificate in Medical Interpreting.

The Pierce College district also offers a number of other courses of potential interest to interpreters, such as courses in medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, criminal justice, law, and social services.  These courses may be offered at Fort Steilacoom, Puyallup or online, and during the day or at night.

For more information on these other courses or on Pierce College in general, go to the Pierce College website.

Language Proficiency Requirements

February 9th, 2012

A high level of language proficiency in two languages is an absolute must for interpreters.  This is not something that can be gained in a short period of time.  As coordinator of the World Languages Department, I have many times been asked “How many quarters will it take for me to become fluent?”  My response to that question is that learning a language is like having a child:  it’s a lifetime commitment.  I would even be willing to guess that the more we know about a language, the more we are likely to learn.

I also get a lot of questions about language proficiency levels required for the interpreting program, everything from “Can I learn Russian or Japanese?” to “I already speak Spanish–how many courses can I skip?”  The answers to both of these questions is disappointing to the asker:  language courses  are not part of the program.  Students are expected to bring a high level of language proficiency with them.

That said, English language learners can enter the program while still in the English as a second language program by enrolling through the I-BEST Program if they are at Level 5 or higher.  The I-BEST office will test any prospective students to see if they qualify.

So if you haven’t been tested, how do you know whether your proficiency in English or another language is high enough?  A good way is to complete the ILR (Interagency Language Roundtable) Language Proficiency self-assessments, and then submit it to me either electronically or in person for analysis.  The self-assessments can be found in PDF format by clicking here and scrolling to the bottom of the page.  Please make an appointment (253.964.6476/tmirande@pierce.ctc.edu) if you wish to meet with me in person or by telephone.

 

Course Offerings: Winter Quarter 2012

November 4th, 2011

 Winter Quarter begins January 9th and runs through March 23 with holidays on January 16th and February 20th.  Registration for Winter Quarter begins November 28th.  Students not enrolled Fall 2011 must apply for admission.  Advising for Winter Quarter begins November 7th.  For advising or further information, post a comment to this posting, contact Professor Terry Mirande at 253. 964.6476 or tmirande@pierce.ctc.edu .

INTP 105  Ethics of Interpreting  3 credits
Tuesdays, 9-11:30 am
tuition and fees for Washington residents:  $314.67
In this course, students will learn the steps of an ethical decision-making process and apply them to cases using a variety of codes of ethics for interpreters, to include Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Washington Courts, National Council on Interpreting in Health Care and others.  Not language specific.

INTP 110  Foundations of Interpreting Skills  5 credits
Mondays and Wednesdays 9 to 12
tuition and fees for Washington residents:  $524.45
In this course, students work in English only to develop a range of interpreting skills, such as short-term memory, note-taking, pre-sessions, interventions, using role-plays, shadowing, and readings.  Designed for beginners, but useful for working interpreters wishing to improve skills.  Not language specific.

INTP 201  Social Service Interpreting Skills  4 credits
Meets Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 10:20 to 12
tuition and fees for Washington residents:  $419.56
In this course, students develop interpreting skills in the three modes of interpretation while developing glossaries and familiarity with a range of social service environments.  Pre-requisite:  INTP 110 and SSMH 100 (Introduction to Human Services) or instructor permission. 

The INTP courses above all meet at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom.  INTP 105 and INTP 110 meet requirements for the Certificate in Community Interpreting and the Certificate in Medical Interpreting.  All three courses meet requirements for the Certificate in Social Service Interpreting.

The Pierce College district also offers a number of other courses of potential interest to interpreters, such as courses in medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, criminal justice, law, and social services.  These courses may be offered at Fort Steilacoom, Puyallup or online, and during the day or at night.

For more information on these other courses or on Pierce College in general, go to the Pierce College website.

How much does it cost?

November 16th, 2010

This is one of the most frequent questions I receive, and one of the most difficult to answer because it depends on several factors.  The factors are:

  1. How many credits you take per quarter
  2. What your residency status is, both state and U.S.
  3. Which certificate(s) you wish to complete, and whether you wish to complete the associate degree
  4. Whether you take your courses online or on the ground

The best place to start is the Pierce College Tuition Calculator–it’s what I use when I try to answer the question on the phone.  Online classes have an additional $8/credit fee that I don’t think is part of the calculation, especially if you are taking a mix of online and grounded classes.

So, if you know your residency–try it, you’ll like it!  You can even play with it, trying out different combinations.

New students being accepted for Winter Quarter

November 5th, 2010

Students wishing to begin working on the Certificate in Community Interpreting and/or the Certificate in Medical Interpreting can begin classes January 3rd.  Advising for Winter Quarter begins Monday, November 8th.

For students wishing to complete a certificate online, the Certificate in Community Interpreting will be offered completely online, except for the lab portion of INTP 110 Foundations of Interpreting Skills.  Labs will be offered in various locations around the state of Washington.  One INTP class will be offered each quarter for Winter, Spring and Summer.  Computer skills may be transferred from another school or taken online.  If there is enough interest in the online program, the Certificate in Medical Interpreting may be added to the online offerings, as most of the required courses are already offered online.

It is possible to complete the Certificate in Community Interpreting in one quarter during Winter Quarter.  All the required courses (INTP 101, INTP 105, INTP 110 and BTECH computer skills options) are offered.  Winter is the only quarter during which this is possible.

The Certificate in Medical Interpreting can be completed in 3 quarters if started  Winter Quarter, and students will complete the requirements for the Certificate in Community Interpreting at the end of Spring Quarter.  The plan to complete this certificate in 3 quarters is as follows:

Winter Quarter (15 credits)

  • INTP 101 (online)
  • INTP 110 MW 9 am-12 Fort Steilacoom
  • BTECH 150 (several options available)

Spring Quarter (12 credits)

  • INTP 105 (online)
  • INTP 202 (MW 9-11:40 am
  • BTECH 151 (several options available)

Summer Quarter (7 credits)

  • INTP 297M (arranged)
  • INTP 298 (arranged)
  • MNGT 284 (online)

Winter Quarter advising begins November 8th

November 1st, 2010

New and current students should take time this week to make an appointment for advising next week or the week after.  Early advising means that you can register on time and get the classes you need.  Registration begins November 15th.

The interpreting courses offered Winter Quarter are:

  • INTP 101 Introduction to Language Interpreting  (online)  5 credits
  • INTP 105 Ethics of Interpreting (Fort Steilacoom)  5 credits
  • INTP 110 Foundations of Interpreting Skills (Fort Steilacoom–includes lab)  5 credits
  • INTP 201 Social Service Interpreting Skills (Fort Steilacoom–includes lab–prequisites:  SSMH 100 [may be taken concurrently] and INTP 110) 4 credits
  • INTP 297 S/M/L Practicum (must have instructor permission and be enrolled in INTP 298–Fort Steilacoom) 1 credit each
  • INTP 298 a/b/c Practicum (must have instructor permission and be enrolled in INTP 297–Fort Steilacoom) 1 credit each

Other courses of interest for interpreting students offered Winter Quarter are:

  • BTECH 111 Keyboarding Skills (lab format–Fort Steilacoom) 3 credits
  • BTECH 200 A, B Microsoft Word (lab format–Fort Steilacoom) 1 credit each
  • BTECH 210 A Microsoft Excel (lab format–Fort Steilacoom) 1 credit
  • BTECH 150 Medical Terminology I (lecture or lab format–Fort Steilacoom or online) 5 credits
  • BTECH 151 Medical Terminology II (lab format–Fort Steilacoom or online) 5 credits
  • for BTECH classes at Puyallup, see the Class Schedule (BTECH 111 is offered as the 1-credit modules BTECH 115 A + 116 A, B)
  • SSMH 100 Introduction to Human Services (Fort Steilacoom) 5 credits

For an advising appointment, contact Terry Mirande at tmirande@pierce.ctc.edu or 253.964.6476, or stop by during office hours:  MWF 9-10 and TTh 11:30-12:30.

A blanket of snow

October 31st, 2010

No, we don’t have one here yet, but the Olympic Mountains clearly have a new one.  Without revealing too much about the mysterious twists and turns of my thought processes, this morning I was lying in bed thinking about the wedding gift I gave my cousin in September–a blanket–and the weather, which is moving headlong towards winter.  This lead to the expression “a blanket of snow” popping into my head as a good example of a problematic expression to render in another language.  The expression, a metaphor, is thoroughly integrated into American English, and actually means a heavy layer of snow, as opposed to a dusting of snow, which means a light layer.

This phrase can really illustrate the pitfalls of literal translation and other rendering errors.  First of all, there’s the metaphor.  It may not be integrated into the target language, and in fact another metaphor may exist in its place:  a cloak of snow, for example.  Then there’s the grammatical structure.  If it’s literally translated, or incorrectly understood, does it result in a possessive, or origin, or something else.  The rendering would be the equivalent of “snow’s blanket,” or “the blanket from snow.”  Finally, there are the potential cultural issues.  What if the culture of the target language has little or no familiarity with blankets or snow?  Then we have, perhaps, something as extreme as “a heavy covering, often used for sleeping made of frozen white precipitation.”

Do I have a solution for this?  Fortunately for me, I don’t work in a language that presents this particular problem.  What I do have to do is to encourage students to think about the problem and to resolve it in the best way possible in their working language.

Field trip planned for 11/23/10

October 31st, 2010

The date has been set for the Introduction to Interpreting class to visit both Harborview Medical Center and King County Superior Court in Seattle.  Both have significant interpreter services departments.  The class will be divided into two groups, with one group visiting HMC and the other the court in the morning.  After a lunch break, the two groups will switch places.  Students will learn about interpreting in both the medical and court environments.  Watch for more news on this!

Students attend conference

October 29th, 2010

On October 15 and 16, 2010 5 Pierce College interpreting students attended the WASCLA Summit VI in Shoreline, WA.  The Washington State Coalition for Language Access works on a variety of issues around equitably providing services to people with limited English proficiency, including continuing education for working interpreters and to service providers that work with interpreters.

The students received registration scholarships through the Pierce College Foundation.  This is the second year that students have attended the conference.  Last year, three students were funded to attend the conference in Spokane, WA.  I invite the students that participated to comment on their experiences.

Launch celebration

October 29th, 2010

Welcome to the Pierce College Interpreting Program blog. The purpose of this blog is to publish information about the program for current, former and potential students, as well as for members of the public that may be interested in our program.  Topics may be as diverse as nuts and bolts information about registering for classes, information about program events, guest posts, and thoughts about language.

The program was launched in January of 2008 with a group combining speakers of Spanish and Korean.  Since then, students in the program have included speakers of, in addition to Spanish and Korean, speakers of Japanese, Lithuanian, German, Russian, Haitian Creole, Vietnamese, and Thai.

I invite you to explore this blog, and if you have any further questions, to contact me at tmirande@pierce.ctc.edu.